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Tutorial: How to set up a Windows/Linux Lite dual-boot with UEFI fully enabled.

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m654321

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SUMMARY
With this tutorial, it could take you less than an hour to set up a Linux Lite (series 2) / Windows OS dual-boot,  with UEFI fully enabled (LL series 2 is based on Ubuntu 14.04). This assumes you already have a Windows OS installed on your PC, and an Ubuntu 14.04 (LTS) iso file burned to DVD or USB stick, Ubuntu being needed for installation of UEFI into Linux Lite. The UEFI dual-boot set-up described below, appears to work well with either Win8.1 or Win10, in combination with LL from LL2.0 to 2.8 (I've tested all of these). LL can be installed as either (1) root only, or (2) with separate root and home partitions.  I prefer the latter, as configuration files are preserved, when upgrading within an LL series, which means certain aspects of the build are not lost e.g. Firefox bookmarks, symlinks in LL to a separate shared data partition, etc.  Upgrading with LL's Lite Upgrade, from LL2.4 upwards, proceeds smoothly and takes less than 10 minutes, the UEFI integrity of the set-up being maintained throughout.  Earlier this year (2016), Jerry indicated to me that it's too early to expect UEFI support, as part of the package within the LL3.0 series.

UPDATES
November 2018: a LL4.2 UEFItestbuild (series 4) is available at http://repo.linuxliteos.com/uefitests/4.2/   
November 2017: a LL3.2 UEFItestbuild (series 3) is available at http://repo.linuxliteos.com/uefitests/3.2/
On the Asus G750JS laptop used in this tutorial, the LL3.2 testbuild failed to install the 'grub-efi-amd64-signed' package (according to the notification that popped up during installation).  As a consequence, without the grub bootloader, the installed system failed to boot for the LL3.2 test build. I have not yet tested the LL4.2 testbuild.

INTRODUCTION
This tutorial is based on the original YouTube video of Nehal J Wani, which involved a LL2.0/Win8 dual boot with UEFI enabled, and is shown here.  I used an Asus G750JS (a gaming laptop) which came pre-installed with Win8.1 Home Edition.  I tested both Win8.1 and the free Win10 upgrade in combination with LL.  I attempted a UEFI enabled setup with Win7, but this was unsuccessful as the laptop is not backwardly compatible with previous versions of Windows OS in UEFI mode (installation of Win7 on such a laptop is only possible when UEFI is turned off [i.e. Legacy/CMS mode switched on]).   However, if you have a laptop, which came preinstalled with Win7 in UEFI mode, I see no reason why a Win7/LL UEFI dual-boot shouldn't work.
,
I saw this video for the first time on the LL forum, posted by Jerry.  Initially, I was able to successfully install LL2.4 in a dual-boot set-up with win8.1, with UEFI  fully enabled.  Data files were shared successfully between the two operating systems, using the symlinking method for  LL.  Though the binding method for sharing data files works well in a dual-boot on my older PC (BIOS set-up), this did not appear to work for the LL2.4/Win8.1 UEFI enabled one.  Details on how to set up data sharing on a dual-boot system have been given in detail elsewhere, on the LL forum, by goldfinger.

In this tutorial, I refer to the following keyboard commands used for the Asus G750JS (your PC may use different ones): F2 (for entering the Setup Utility), F10 to save & exit any Setup Utility changes, and Esc (for accessing the Boot Device list).  Alternatively, I could access the Setup Utility using the Esc key, as this utility is presented as one of the choices in the Boot Device list.

The setting up of the UEFI dual-boot system, described here, is divided into 4 sections (A to D) with additional sections (E & F):
A. Shrinking Windows-OS to free up space for Linux Lite installation
B. Changing computer setup from Secure Boot (UEFI) to Legacy mode
C. Installation of Linux Lite
D. Enabling UEFI using Ubuntu live media
E. Editing the Grub Screen (optional)
F.  Problems you may encounter & how to resolve them

 
A. SHRINKING WINDOWS-OS TO FREE UP SPACE FOR LINUX LITE INSTALLATION
1. Boot into Windows: go to Disk Management and shrink drive C (Windows-OS) to free up the hard drive for the linux partition(s), i.e. for bios-grub, root, home and swap partitions.  Initially, I had some problems when I left unallocated space on the hard drive, so in subsequent installs I ensured there was no unallocated space left over.  From my own experimenting, I have found that you can, alternatively, shrink the Windows OS partition from the LL side using gparted (linux partition manager tool)

Creating 10-15GB of free space for the LL root partition is sufficient, if you are storing your personal files on a separate home partition or a separate data partition.  A fully installed LL appears to occupy less than 6GB of disk space: compare this to Win7 (~35GB) and Win8.1 or 10 (~50GB)!  If you're installing LL merely as root (i.e. no separate home or data partitions), then you will need upwards of 20GB,  the size depending obviously on the amount of  space you need for file storage.

I suspect a swap partition probably isn't necessary if you have a solid state drive - though I'm no expert on this.  On my PC, the swap file on the hard disk drive never seemed to be used, once I had changed its swappiness in the  /etc/sys ctl.conf  file  from 60 (default value) to 10.  In all subsequent dual-boot installations, where I used SSDs instead of HDDs (from 18 October 2015), I omitted the swap partition and it didn't make any difference to the smooth running of the set-up.

B. CHANGING COMPUTER SET-UP FROM SECURE BOOT TO LEGACY MODE
LL installation (section C), and subsequently the use of Ubuntu live media (section D), only appears to work in Legacy mode - therefore UEFI (Secure Boot) needs to be turned off.
2. Access Setup Utility by keeping F2 key pressed down while pressing the power-on button
3. Use arrow keys to toggle across to Security, toggle down to Secure Boot menu
4. Hit Enter, then again, and toggle to Disabled, and hit Enter again
5. Hit Esc to access Setup choices again, & toggle  to Boot where you need to enable Launch CSM (also known as Legacy mode)

C. INSTALLATION OF LINUX LITE
6. Before exiting and rebooting, put LL CD into CD/DVD tray; close tray
7. Press F10 key to save and exit Setup, choose Yes, confirm this by hitting Enter, then keep Esc button pressed while powering down & rebooting; this will bring you to a blue window listing the boot devices
8. Toggle down to the CD drive (e.g. listed on my laptop as P2: MATSHITABD-CMB UJ160), then hit Enter – this will bring you to the Welcome to Linux Lite screen
9. Choose Start Linux Lite
10. R-click on Linux Lite installer on the screen, and start LL installation in the usual way by clicking on Execute, and proceed through Language, Wireless install, etc... until you get to the Installation type window, where you need to choose Something else.
11.  In the partition table use the free space to create the following partitions:

 - Biosgrub                16MB is ample, also listed as Reserved BIOS boot area
 - swap                       around 1 to 2 x the size of RAM - doesn't seem necessary with an SSD
 - root  or  /              a minimum of 10 to 15 GB, but upwards of 20GB if not installing a separate home partition
 - home
or /home     this last partition is optional: a good idea though if you wish to conserve configuration files, & therefore preserve as much of your build as possible when using Lite Upgrade

D. ENABLING UEFI USING UBUNTU LIVE MEDIA
For this I prepared an Ubuntu 14.04.1 LTS installation CD, from a downloaded iso file.
12.  When LL installation is completed, reboot, but first remove the LL installation CD from CD-tray and replace with the Ubuntu installation CD.
13. On rebooting, keep Esc-key depressed until the  boot device  list appears – choose Ubuntu UEFI mode (e.g. listed under boot devices  on my computer as UEFI: MATSHITABD_CMB UJ160), hit Enter
14. A message will then appear on the screen confirming that you are Booting in insecure mode. Alternatively, instead of this message, the following may appear briefly (but just ignore it and continue): could not open \EFI\BOOT\fallback.efi: 14
15. At the grub-screen choose the option *Try Ubuntu without installing
16. When the Ubuntu screen appears, click search icon (top left icon) and type X into the search box – the Xterm icon (Ubuntu's terminal) will then appear – click on it to open the terminal.

In the terminal you need to be in super-user mode so type the following:
Code: [Select]
ubuntu@ubuntu:~$ sudo su
You now need to find out the partition in which LL is installed, before mounting it
Code: [Select]
root@ubuntu:/home/ubuntu# gdisk -l /dev/sda    (NB: -l is minus letter, not minus one)

A partition table will then appear showing the partitions on the disk.
Let's suppose sda7 contains LL and sda2 contains the EFI files (as on my laptop), so these are mounted as follows:
Code: [Select]
root@ubuntu:/home/ubuntu# mount /dev/sda7 /mnt/
root@ubuntu:/home/ubuntu# mkdir -p /mnt/boot/efi
root@ubuntu:/home/ubuntu# mount /dev/sda2 /mnt/boot/efi 

Some more useful directories are also then mounted:
Code: [Select]
root@ubuntu:/home/ubuntu# for i in /dev/ /dev/pts /proc/ /sys/ ; do mount -B $i /mnt/$i ; done   
root@ubuntu:/home/ubuntu# chroot /mnt/ 

You are now inside Linux Lite
Code: [Select]
root@ubuntu:/# cat /etc/issue 
The following will appear on the screen, confirming this: Linux Lite 2.4 LTS \n \l

 
Now, make sure your internet connection (WiFi or cable) is on, as  updates are now going to be downloaded… 
Code: [Select]
root@ubuntu:/# apt-get update
root@ubuntu:/# apt-get purge -y --force-yes grub* shim-signed linux-signed* 

A window will then pop-up, entitled Configuring grub-pc, asking if you want to remove GRUB 2 from /boot/grub… click on the option <Yes>
Code: [Select]
root@ubuntu:/# apt-get install -y --force-yes grub-efi-amd64-signed shim-signed linux-signed-generic   
Then add boot menu entry for EFI firmware configuration; however this doesn't add Windows 
Code: [Select]
root@ubuntu:/# grub-mkconfig -o /boot/grub/grub.cfg
Installing for x86_64-efi platform
Code: [Select]
root@ubuntu:/# grub-install /dev/sda 
Installation now finished, so rebooting
Code: [Select]
root@ubuntu:/# exit
root@ubuntu:/home/ubuntu# reboot 

On rebooting into LL, open the terminal and sign in as superuser (root)
Code: [Select]
mike@linuxlite:~$ sudo su 
Enter password, then add Windows to boot menu entry 
Code: [Select]
 
root@linuxlite-test:/home/mike# grub-mkconfig -o /boot/grub/grub.cfg
root@linuxlite-test:/home/mike# reboot 

Just one more thing to do now on rebooting - change Legacy back to UEFI mode in the Setup Utility. In each of the following cases, hit Enter to confirm the choice made (as in Section B above).  To do this, keep F2 key pressed down as you reboot. You can reset UEFI in one of two ways:
  • choose the option of Restore Defaults (scroll down under the Save & Exit tab) - the easiest option; or
  • enable Secure Boot Menu (scroll down with arrow keys under Security tab), then disable Launch CSM (scroll down under Boot tab).
In either case, press F10 key to save & exit settings and reboot. Disabling Launch CSM (Legacy) will automatically enable Fast Boot.  One minor problem I had initially at shutdown, was that LL appeared to hang indefinitely - disabling Fast Boot solved this issue.  You are now done! 

E. EDITING THE GRUB SCREEN (optional)
When you reboot into LL, it will be  listed alongside the Windows OS on the  grub screen, though will be named Ubuntu (appearing as *Ubuntu). According to Wani's  Youtube video  you can edit the grub.cfg  file, using vi (a file editor), to change the name from Ubuntu to Linux Lite.   I tried this but was unsuccessful: his video moves so rapidly it isn't always very clear what he's doing each time, and unfortunately there's no verbal commentary to clarify this.

However, there is a simpler way of doing this which avoids using vi  - many thanks to Wani who gave me instructions for this as follows:

Open the terminal then type...
Code: [Select]
sudo su Enter password, following password prompt - you are now logged-in as superuser - then type...
Code: [Select]
sudo sed -i 's/Ubuntu/Linux Lite 2.4/g' /boot/grub/grub.cfg

This replaces all instances of  the word Ubuntu, in the grub configuration file, with Linux Lite 2.4.  If you prefer, you can leave out the version number of 2.4, or change it to whichever version you wish as new releases of LL become available.   

F. PROBLEMS YOU MAY ENCOUNTER & HOW TO SOLVE THEM
I experienced the following four issues:
1. NVRAM & failure to boot into the grub-screen
2. Grub-screen listing of LL as 'Linux Lite' changes to 'Ubuntu'
3. Occasional hanging of LL at start-up screen
4. Failure of Lite Control Centre to open (LL2.6)

Problem 1 - NVRAM and failure to boot into the grub-screen
You may find (as I did) that if you remove the UEFI LL2.4/win8.1 dual-boot hard drive  from your computer (call it HDD1), use another hard drive and its operating system temporarily (call it HDD2), remove HDD2 and replace it with the original HDD1,  your dual-boot will not work!  On reinstating HDD1 it only boots into win8.1, the grub screen not appearing at all...

... however, don't panic - all is not lost, as I'll show below!  Wani explained, to me, that the aforementioned happens as there is something called NVRAM (non-volatile random access memory) where the boot options are stored.  It's highly likely that when replacing one HDD for another, the NVRAM got cleared and so the first boot option (which was supposed to be Linux Lite) was deleted from the NVRAM.  Wani also kindly supplied the solution to this problem below.

You can reinstate the grub screen as follows - you need to be in Legacy or CSM mode to do this (see Section B above), reinstate UEFI mode when done (see end of Section D):

1) Boot computer - when in win8.1, open CD tray and insert your original LL installation CD
2) Restart computer, keeping Esc-key depressed until Boot Device List appears
3) Select CD from the boot list to boot into LL from the live environment
4) Once live LL is booted, open the terminal and type...

Code: [Select]
sudo su
Enter password, following password prompt - you are now logged-in as superuser.
Now you need to mount the /boot/efi file, but first you need to check which partition it's on using the gdisk program...
Code: [Select]
sudo gdisk -l /dev/sda
Let's suppose it's on partition sda2, so mounting /boot/efi and then reinstating the grub screen as follows
Code: [Select]
sudo mount /dev/sda2 /boot/efi
sudo grub-mkconfig -o /boot/grub/grub.cfg
sudo grub-install /dev/sda 


Then reboot by typing...
Code: [Select]
reboot

The computer should now boot into the grub screen, showing the LL or win8.1 boot choices.

Problem 2 - grub-screen entry reverts from Linux Lite to Ubuntu, following a routine installation of  Linux Lite updates - added on 24.12.15
In Section E (above) I showed how the entry of 'Ubuntu' in the grub screen could be edited to Linux Lite. However, I have found that every-now-and-then, following installation of updates, the grub-entry name of Linux Lite, appears to revert to Ubuntu.  It's mildly irritating, but you can simply re-edit the grub-screen, going through the steps in Section E, again. Alternatively, you can just leave it as is, since the grub-entry name in itself does not change the functioning of Linux Lite at all in any way - it's just a label. 

Added on 30.09.16:  A much easier and quicker way of editing any grub-screen entry, such as the one quoted above, is to use an app called  grub-customizer.  As far as I know, the latest *.deb version is as follows: grub-customizer_5.0.6-0ubuntu1~ppa1t_amd64.deb - after downloading, simply install with gdebi package manager.
 
Problem 3 - occasional hanging of Linux Lite at start-up screen - added on 24.12.15
This problem does not show up on my older Asus X71Q (c.2008), where the dual-boot has been working very smoothly, since it was set-up in 2014.

However, there has been a bit of 'roughness' with the UEFI-enabled set-up described in this tutorial, on my newer Asus G750JS (c.2014). Though in general it works very well, booting into LL from the grub-screen does periodically get stuck at the LL start-up screen, and hangs indefinitely.  The only solution I've tried (though I'm no expert), which seems to work, is to go into the Set-up Utility and turn UEFI mode off (i.e. disable Secure Boot) and choose enable for CSM.  Once normal booting resumes, you can revert the settings to UEFI (enable Secure Boot), disable CSM, and make sure that Fast Start is disabled.

Update 17.08.16: on my set-up, this issue is related to the use of an SSD drive for the operating systems rather than a problem of UEFI. Evidence for this comes from the following observations: (1) when the SSD is replaced with an HDD, the 'hanging issue' does not seem to occur; (2) when the dual-boot is set up on an SSD disk with MBR partition table, in Legacy (CSM) mode, the problem still persists.

Problem 4 – failure for Lite Control Center to open (in LL2.6) - added on 24.12.15
This first happened when I upgraded from LL 2.4 to LL 2.6, and a further time since then.  For some reason the webkit, needed for it to function, sometimes disappears and needs reinstalling. Shaggytwodope previously helped me out on this one, showing how to reinstall the webkit at the link https://www.linuxliteos.com/forums/installing-linux-lite/upgraded-to-ll2-6-lite-control-center-won't-open/msg19708/?topicseen#msg19708

I should add, that on both occasions when the Lite Control Center refused to open, I didn't need to delete and reinstall it – merely reinstalling the webkit sufficed.

I will keep you updated with any further developments or observations with this set-up: watch this space.

Hoping this tutorial works for you...
Regards
Mike
Last Edit: May 12, 2019, 08:36:20 AM by m654321
Linux-user since 2014. 64bit OS installed in Legacy mode on MBR (msdos/ext4) formatted SSDs (except the pi which uses a micro SDHC card):
2017 - Raspberry pi 3B (4cores) ~ Arm710@1.2GHz - LibreElec, used for upgrading our Samsung TV (excellent for the task)  
2012 - Lenovo G580 2689 (2cores; 4threads] ~ i3-3110M - LL3.8/Win8.1 dual-boot (LL working smoothly)
2011 - Samsung NP-N145 Plus (1core; 2threads) ~ Intel Atom N455@1.66GHz - Slitaz5 rolling (tried LL3 series but lagged)
2008 - Asus X71Q (2cores) ~ Intel T3200@2.0GHz - LL4.4/Win8.1 dual-boot (LL working beautifully)
2007 - Dell Latitude D630 (2cores) ~ Intel T7100@1.8GHz - LL3.8/Win8.1 dual-boot (LL really zippy!) - my daily driver  :-)
 


 

shaggytwodope

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Thank you for sharing and well done, remember you can make use of the code tags to make the commands a bit more obvious for vistors.
The Truth is out there.
Be sure to check the Manual out and always report Bugs or feature requests.
 

 

Jerry

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A fantastic addition!!! Thank you m654321 :)
 

 

m654321

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Thanks Shaggy and Jerry - it's a pleasure to share this - it's the least I can do in return for all the invaluable  help & guidance I've received on this Forum, since leaving Windows XP...

UPDATE 1:
I forgot to add that Legacy needs to be changed back to UEFI, following installation of the Ubuntu live media - I have now added this at the end of the tutorial.

Regards
Mike
Last Edit: August 17, 2016, 04:46:15 AM by m654321
Linux-user since 2014. 64bit OS installed in Legacy mode on MBR (msdos/ext4) formatted SSDs (except the pi which uses a micro SDHC card):
2017 - Raspberry pi 3B (4cores) ~ Arm710@1.2GHz - LibreElec, used for upgrading our Samsung TV (excellent for the task)  
2012 - Lenovo G580 2689 (2cores; 4threads] ~ i3-3110M - LL3.8/Win8.1 dual-boot (LL working smoothly)
2011 - Samsung NP-N145 Plus (1core; 2threads) ~ Intel Atom N455@1.66GHz - Slitaz5 rolling (tried LL3 series but lagged)
2008 - Asus X71Q (2cores) ~ Intel T3200@2.0GHz - LL4.4/Win8.1 dual-boot (LL working beautifully)
2007 - Dell Latitude D630 (2cores) ~ Intel T7100@1.8GHz - LL3.8/Win8.1 dual-boot (LL really zippy!) - my daily driver  :-)
 

 

N4RPS

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Hello!

Thanks for posting this. Between the video and your tutorial, pretty much anyone can install UEFI in Linux Lite...

73 DE N4RPS
Rob
 


A gun in your hand is worth more than a whole police force on the phone.
 

 

m654321

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The tutorial might also work for any other distros, based on Ubuntu... worth a try for those interested.
(according to the Ubuntu forums, support for UEFI  Secure Boot first appeared in Ubuntu 12.10 and 12.04.2 - I have used Ubuntu 14.04.1).

Mike
Last Edit: July 12, 2017, 01:43:46 AM by m654321
Linux-user since 2014. 64bit OS installed in Legacy mode on MBR (msdos/ext4) formatted SSDs (except the pi which uses a micro SDHC card):
2017 - Raspberry pi 3B (4cores) ~ Arm710@1.2GHz - LibreElec, used for upgrading our Samsung TV (excellent for the task)  
2012 - Lenovo G580 2689 (2cores; 4threads] ~ i3-3110M - LL3.8/Win8.1 dual-boot (LL working smoothly)
2011 - Samsung NP-N145 Plus (1core; 2threads) ~ Intel Atom N455@1.66GHz - Slitaz5 rolling (tried LL3 series but lagged)
2008 - Asus X71Q (2cores) ~ Intel T3200@2.0GHz - LL4.4/Win8.1 dual-boot (LL working beautifully)
2007 - Dell Latitude D630 (2cores) ~ Intel T7100@1.8GHz - LL3.8/Win8.1 dual-boot (LL really zippy!) - my daily driver  :-)
 

 

misko_2083

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Thank you Mike. You made an outstanding tutorial.

Folks don't forget to click thanks.
Last Edit: July 18, 2015, 03:00:24 PM by misko_2083
 

 

m654321

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Many thanks Misko - I liked the 'saucy cartoon' !

The Ubuntu live media I used for the tutorial was originally version 14.10.
However, support for this was only for 9 months and only just ended two days ago, on the 24th July 2015 - this means it will not install UEFI (as I've just found out!)

Instead use the long term support version, i.e. 14.04.1 LTS (a.k.a. Trusty Tahr).  Support for this expires in April 2019, which I think coincides with that for LL2.4.  I've just tried 14.04.1, for installing LL2.4 in the dual-boot, with UEFI fully-enabled, and it works fine.  The relevant updating has therefore been made to the Tutorial and one of my posts. You can download the iso file to burn to CD from...   http://old-releases.ubuntu.com/releases/14.04.0/

One tip, that may  save a lot of time if you have any accidents, is to first make a master version of the dual-boot set-up that you can go back to and clone, should you have any 'accidents' with your working copy.  For example, from Amazon, I bought a new 250GB HDD (Western Digital blue) for only £25, and set up the master dual-boot on this. I then used a 250GB SDD (Samsung 850 Evo, around £75) as my working copy - you get cloning software with this SSD, so you can easily copy from your master to the working version.  Alternatively, you can use linux's dd command to make cloned copies.   

Regards
Mike

 
Last Edit: July 24, 2015, 10:29:41 AM by m654321
Linux-user since 2014. 64bit OS installed in Legacy mode on MBR (msdos/ext4) formatted SSDs (except the pi which uses a micro SDHC card):
2017 - Raspberry pi 3B (4cores) ~ Arm710@1.2GHz - LibreElec, used for upgrading our Samsung TV (excellent for the task)  
2012 - Lenovo G580 2689 (2cores; 4threads] ~ i3-3110M - LL3.8/Win8.1 dual-boot (LL working smoothly)
2011 - Samsung NP-N145 Plus (1core; 2threads) ~ Intel Atom N455@1.66GHz - Slitaz5 rolling (tried LL3 series but lagged)
2008 - Asus X71Q (2cores) ~ Intel T3200@2.0GHz - LL4.4/Win8.1 dual-boot (LL working beautifully)
2007 - Dell Latitude D630 (2cores) ~ Intel T7100@1.8GHz - LL3.8/Win8.1 dual-boot (LL really zippy!) - my daily driver  :-)
 

 

m654321

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UPDATE 2:
I have just edited the first paragraph of the first post in this thread, so as to include a note about what did work / didn't work re.  file-sharing between the operating systems in the dual-boot set-up I described.

Regards
Mike
Last Edit: August 17, 2016, 04:48:46 AM by m654321
Linux-user since 2014. 64bit OS installed in Legacy mode on MBR (msdos/ext4) formatted SSDs (except the pi which uses a micro SDHC card):
2017 - Raspberry pi 3B (4cores) ~ Arm710@1.2GHz - LibreElec, used for upgrading our Samsung TV (excellent for the task)  
2012 - Lenovo G580 2689 (2cores; 4threads] ~ i3-3110M - LL3.8/Win8.1 dual-boot (LL working smoothly)
2011 - Samsung NP-N145 Plus (1core; 2threads) ~ Intel Atom N455@1.66GHz - Slitaz5 rolling (tried LL3 series but lagged)
2008 - Asus X71Q (2cores) ~ Intel T3200@2.0GHz - LL4.4/Win8.1 dual-boot (LL working beautifully)
2007 - Dell Latitude D630 (2cores) ~ Intel T7100@1.8GHz - LL3.8/Win8.1 dual-boot (LL really zippy!) - my daily driver  :-)
 

 

m654321

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UPDATE 3:

BUG reported.
Please scroll down to this paragraph in the tutorial (1st post of this thread)....

Some more useful directories are also then mounted:

root@ubuntu:/home/ubuntu# for i in /dev/ /dev/pts /proc/ /sys/ ; do mount -B $i /mnt/$i ; done     

See code which says 'for i in /dev/......'    (which is correct)
For some of you, when you copied and pasted, this may have erroneously come up as                    'for inin /dev.....'  which is incorrect.  This happened because an 'n' (in white font) was inserted after the first 'i' to prevent the single 'i' auto-capitalising.  I have now corrected this bug.

Apologies if this caused any headaches for some of you.

Regards
Mike
Last Edit: August 17, 2016, 04:49:23 AM by m654321
Linux-user since 2014. 64bit OS installed in Legacy mode on MBR (msdos/ext4) formatted SSDs (except the pi which uses a micro SDHC card):
2017 - Raspberry pi 3B (4cores) ~ Arm710@1.2GHz - LibreElec, used for upgrading our Samsung TV (excellent for the task)  
2012 - Lenovo G580 2689 (2cores; 4threads] ~ i3-3110M - LL3.8/Win8.1 dual-boot (LL working smoothly)
2011 - Samsung NP-N145 Plus (1core; 2threads) ~ Intel Atom N455@1.66GHz - Slitaz5 rolling (tried LL3 series but lagged)
2008 - Asus X71Q (2cores) ~ Intel T3200@2.0GHz - LL4.4/Win8.1 dual-boot (LL working beautifully)
2007 - Dell Latitude D630 (2cores) ~ Intel T7100@1.8GHz - LL3.8/Win8.1 dual-boot (LL really zippy!) - my daily driver  :-)
 

 

misko_2083

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BUG reported. Please scroll down to this paragraph in the tutorial (1st post of this thread)....

Some more useful directories are also then mounted:

root@ubuntu:/home/ubuntu# for i in /dev/ /dev/pts /proc/ /sys/ ; do mount -B $i /mnt/$i ; done     

See code which says 'for i in /dev/......'    (which is correct)
For some of you, when you copied and pasted, this may have erroneously come up as                    'for inin /dev.....'  which is incorrect.  This happened because an 'n' (in white font) was inserted after the first 'i' to prevent the single 'i' auto-capitalising.  I have now corrected this bug.

Apologies if this caused any headaches for some of you.

Regards
Mike

Hello Mike perhaphs if you use the code tags it would make a difference.
 

 

m654321

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Quote
Hello Mike perhaphs if you use the code tags it would make a difference.

Thanks misko, that's really helpful - hopefully my posts will be a bit clearer in future.
I'm slowly getting there...

Regards
Mike


Linux-user since 2014. 64bit OS installed in Legacy mode on MBR (msdos/ext4) formatted SSDs (except the pi which uses a micro SDHC card):
2017 - Raspberry pi 3B (4cores) ~ Arm710@1.2GHz - LibreElec, used for upgrading our Samsung TV (excellent for the task)  
2012 - Lenovo G580 2689 (2cores; 4threads] ~ i3-3110M - LL3.8/Win8.1 dual-boot (LL working smoothly)
2011 - Samsung NP-N145 Plus (1core; 2threads) ~ Intel Atom N455@1.66GHz - Slitaz5 rolling (tried LL3 series but lagged)
2008 - Asus X71Q (2cores) ~ Intel T3200@2.0GHz - LL4.4/Win8.1 dual-boot (LL working beautifully)
2007 - Dell Latitude D630 (2cores) ~ Intel T7100@1.8GHz - LL3.8/Win8.1 dual-boot (LL really zippy!) - my daily driver  :-)
 

 

m654321

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Thanks Misko - I've now added the code tags - makes a big difference to overall presentation.
They look really cool  8)

Cheers
Mike
Linux-user since 2014. 64bit OS installed in Legacy mode on MBR (msdos/ext4) formatted SSDs (except the pi which uses a micro SDHC card):
2017 - Raspberry pi 3B (4cores) ~ Arm710@1.2GHz - LibreElec, used for upgrading our Samsung TV (excellent for the task)  
2012 - Lenovo G580 2689 (2cores; 4threads] ~ i3-3110M - LL3.8/Win8.1 dual-boot (LL working smoothly)
2011 - Samsung NP-N145 Plus (1core; 2threads) ~ Intel Atom N455@1.66GHz - Slitaz5 rolling (tried LL3 series but lagged)
2008 - Asus X71Q (2cores) ~ Intel T3200@2.0GHz - LL4.4/Win8.1 dual-boot (LL working beautifully)
2007 - Dell Latitude D630 (2cores) ~ Intel T7100@1.8GHz - LL3.8/Win8.1 dual-boot (LL really zippy!) - my daily driver  :-)
 

 

misko_2083

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Cheers Mike  :)
BBcode reference:
http://www.bbcode.org/reference.php
 

 

m654321

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UPDATE 4:
I have edited instruction 14 (Section D) of the Tutorial re. the message 'could not open \EFI\BOOT\fallback.efi: 14' that may appear on your screen while installing UEFI with Ubuntu live media. As mentioned in the edit, just ignore the message and continue with the live media - it doesn't appear to affect the successfull setting up of the UEFI dual-boot.

At present, I'm working on one or two other updates to the tutorial, i.e:
 
1. How to edit the grub screen to change the listed OS name from *Ubuntu to Linux Lite
2. What to do if your grub screen disappears at startup and boots straight into win8.1. - this happened to me following temporary removal of the UEFI dual-boot HDD from the laptop, working with another HDD for a short time, and then subsequently putting back the original UEFI dual-boot HDD into the laptop. Perplexing to say the least...

Regards
Mike

Last Edit: August 17, 2016, 04:50:33 AM by m654321
Linux-user since 2014. 64bit OS installed in Legacy mode on MBR (msdos/ext4) formatted SSDs (except the pi which uses a micro SDHC card):
2017 - Raspberry pi 3B (4cores) ~ Arm710@1.2GHz - LibreElec, used for upgrading our Samsung TV (excellent for the task)  
2012 - Lenovo G580 2689 (2cores; 4threads] ~ i3-3110M - LL3.8/Win8.1 dual-boot (LL working smoothly)
2011 - Samsung NP-N145 Plus (1core; 2threads) ~ Intel Atom N455@1.66GHz - Slitaz5 rolling (tried LL3 series but lagged)
2008 - Asus X71Q (2cores) ~ Intel T3200@2.0GHz - LL4.4/Win8.1 dual-boot (LL working beautifully)
2007 - Dell Latitude D630 (2cores) ~ Intel T7100@1.8GHz - LL3.8/Win8.1 dual-boot (LL really zippy!) - my daily driver  :-)
 


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