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Autologin for user account

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Re: Autologin for user account
« Reply #12 on: June 12, 2014, 06:45:23 AM »
 

Jerry

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Re: Autologin for user account
« Reply #11 on: June 12, 2014, 06:43:44 AM »
 

leillo1975

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I need to fix this issue to install Linux Lite 2 in 31 computers

Glad you got this fixed, what 31 computers do you have Linux Lite on? Do you own an Internet Cafe or something? Thank you.

I'm system administrator in a Technical School of Spain. We have a classroom with 31 very old computers (over 10 years) that nobody uses, and I want to prepare it to internet browsing and other programs like Libreoffice, gimp or audacity
 

Re: Autologin for user account
« Reply #10 on: June 06, 2014, 12:00:05 PM »
 

Jerry

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I need to fix this issue to install Linux Lite 2 in 31 computers

Glad you got this fixed, what 31 computers do you have Linux Lite on? Do you own an Internet Cafe or something? Thank you.
 

Re: Autologin for user account
« Reply #9 on: June 05, 2014, 10:55:18 AM »
 

leillo1975

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First -- I'm assuming you set the user up without "sudo" privileges.  In that case, the user has their own password that can be used for logging in and that password can't be used to conduct admin activities.  So you shouldn't have to worry about that password being known.

Second -- since I don't run a multi-user set-up, I ran a few tests to see if I could duplicate your problem.  I tried using the GUI in the Menu's allow/disallow auto-login feature after adding a new user.  (I'm guessing that is what you were trying to use.)  "Yes" -- I ran into same problem as you.  It would not allow the change to take effect and have the "non-sudo" user automatically logged in on startup.

So I did a search and found a different way to do it -- by editing the file that controls for that.

*  Using your account that has sudo priviledges, open your file manager (Thunar).
*  Navigate to the root directory (/); then to the /etc directory.
*  Under /etc, find the lightdm directory, right-click it and choose to "open as Administrator".
*  Now look for the file lightdm.conf and open it with your text editor (leafpad).
*  Look for the line "autologin-user=XXXX" and fill in the username that you want logged-in automatically in place of the XXXX.
*  Save file and close it.  Close file manager.
*  Reboot computer and it should auto-login that user.  (It worked in my tests.)


I can't found lightdm.conf. If I create it and add "autologin-user=-user-", when I restart the system It been blocked.

If I use the Autologin Scripts, it fails becouse can't found lightdm.conf

I need to fix this issue to install Linux Lite 2 in 31 computers



EDITED


Finally I found the solution. I create lightdm.conf in /etc/lightdm/ and I add the following lines into it:

Code: [Select]
[SeatDefaults]
greeter-session=lightdm-webkit-greeter
user-session=xfce
autologin-user=---USERNAME---
allow-guest=false
« Last Edit: June 05, 2014, 11:16:49 AM by leillo1975 »
 

Re: Autologin for user account
« Reply #8 on: May 15, 2014, 09:35:38 AM »
 

N4RPS

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Hello!

In a nutshell, unlike Windows, where you can assign users to a group of 'administrators', there is only one administrator - the 'root' user.....

73 DE N4RPS
Rob



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Re: Autologin for user account
« Reply #7 on: May 14, 2014, 09:46:03 PM »
 

gold_finger

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Okay.  On Ubuntu-based Linux distros, the user is NOT running as an administrator (as root) during normal operation.  You can temporarily be granted root privileges to perform admin activities, like installing software, but to do so requires entering a password.  Nothing can be done to make critical system changes without entering the password.  There's no pop-up box that you just click "OK" on -- you have to enter a password to do anything as root.

Root privileges expire within a short time frame (approx. 10 minutes I think), or as soon as you close out the program you were conducting the admin functions in.  Then you are back to running as a normal user again.

To run a command in the terminal as root you begin the command with "sudo", then enter your password.  For example, if you wanted to install the "Radiotray" program, you would not be able to do it with this command:
Code: [Select]
apt-get install radiotray
You would have to precede the command with "sudo" like this:
Code: [Select]
sudo apt-get install radiotray
Then, you would have to confirm the action by entering your password when asked -- otherwise the action will fail.

If you want to run a GUI program as root, then you precede the command with "gksu".  Here's an example where you open the Leafpad text editor as root:
Code: [Select]
gksu leafpad
If your password is known by others, or easily guessed then that's a different problem.  Aside from that, admin functions can't be performed without you deliberately allowing them.

Long story short -- you don't need to create a separate user account.  It's a good thing to have for other users of the computer that you don't want to give root privileges to, but if it's just you there is no need for that.

With regard to keeping data on a separate partition, I like that idea and do the same thing myself.  Makes things a lot easier if you ever need to re-install, upgrade, switch distros, or access the same data from different operating systems.


P.s.  Some other Linux distros do things differently.  They may indeed have separate root and normal users and not use the "sudo" and "gksu" methods of granting temporary elevated privileges; but that's not the case with LL.
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Re: Autologin for user account
« Reply #6 on: May 14, 2014, 04:28:18 AM »
 

Colin23erk

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thanks for replying

From what I have read about using Linux.  For Security it is better not to use the Administrator Account for everyday use so I created a separate User account that I wanted to use without a Login Password .

As a single home user and new to Linux I wonder if the security aspect applies more to Corporate System Administrators or is better when connected to the internet to help prevent  malware etc being installed.

As a long time computer user I have been security minded by always separating my OS and Data into different partitions so that I can replace a faulty OS without loosing my Data.

Colin
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Re: Autologin for user account
« Reply #5 on: May 13, 2014, 06:57:03 PM »
 

gold_finger

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Colin23erk,

I'm not entirely clear on what you are trying to do.  I'm guessing that you want the non-admin user to be automatically logged in on startup.  If that's the case, as noted above, the GUI doesn't work for some reason.  (Or, I just don't know right way to get it to work.)

If you follow advise in my last post to edit the file responsible for auto-login manually, you should be able to get it working.

If that's not what you are trying to do, let us know.
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Re: Autologin for user account
« Reply #4 on: May 13, 2014, 04:37:20 PM »
 

Colin23erk

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on this subject
When I tried to use ----System/ Login Settings/ Autologin   - it failed because I did not have Sudo privileges
I went into my Administrators Account and gave my User Account Sudo privileges .
Set up Autologin on my User Account and then went back and removed Sudo.

Autologin works OK but I get an error later ---"The login keyring did not get unlocked when you logged into your computer." --- which defeats the exercise of using AutoLogin . I found aswers on the web but not for Lite - UbuntuHandbook talked about  Unity Dash but I did not find it with ---Run> unity
If I reverse the option using Sudo privileges normal login returns

I have also tried changing my User Password via ---Settings/User Manager/ Change Password - but even entering User and Administrator passwords when asked nothing happened . I have also tried to change the Administrators Password but it appears that the password used first is difficult to change .
Any simple help via GUI appreciated
Colin

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An "example" is worth a 1000 words
 

Re: Autologin for user account
« Reply #3 on: May 08, 2014, 05:16:18 PM »
 

william_st_ia

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Thanks so much for the help!
 

Re: Autologin for user account
« Reply #2 on: May 06, 2014, 06:22:43 PM »
 

gold_finger

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First -- I'm assuming you set the user up without "sudo" privileges.  In that case, the user has their own password that can be used for logging in and that password can't be used to conduct admin activities.  So you shouldn't have to worry about that password being known.

Second -- since I don't run a multi-user set-up, I ran a few tests to see if I could duplicate your problem.  I tried using the GUI in the Menu's allow/disallow auto-login feature after adding a new user.  (I'm guessing that is what you were trying to use.)  "Yes" -- I ran into same problem as you.  It would not allow the change to take effect and have the "non-sudo" user automatically logged in on startup.

So I did a search and found a different way to do it -- by editing the file that controls for that.

*  Using your account that has sudo priviledges, open your file manager (Thunar).
*  Navigate to the root directory (/); then to the /etc directory.
*  Under /etc, find the lightdm directory, right-click it and choose to "open as Administrator".
*  Now look for the file lightdm.conf and open it with your text editor (leafpad).
*  Look for the line "autologin-user=XXXX" and fill in the username that you want logged-in automatically in place of the XXXX.
*  Save file and close it.  Close file manager.
*  Reboot computer and it should auto-login that user.  (It worked in my tests.)
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Autologin for user account
« Reply #1 on: May 06, 2014, 04:17:17 PM »
 

william_st_ia

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Hi All,
I have and Admin account created and a user account.
How do I get the user account to auto-login?
We need this setup that way so we are not giving out the password.
 

 

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