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Tips for buying hardware?

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Re: Tips for buying hardware?
« Reply #15 on: August 24, 2019, 08:53:31 PM »
 

MS

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The best tip when buying hardware is researching the hardware you are considering buying and making sure it's compatible with the system you are going to install it in and is compatible with the OS.
Very true. It is good to know what one is buying the hardware for. It makes things a lot easier. Especially for people who may unnecessarily be tech savvy or may have some knowledge outdated - in the modern tech, it could happen fast. Perhaps simply to seek out the listed requirements, if the thing is a particular - or peculiar - piece of software and maybe ask someone from the consumer help, where the purchase is being done. It is always a solid thing to work with if to give specific parameters for the machine desired to achieve.

Facing it, otherwise it is a lottery. Even if the required specs are low, it is good to make sure for compatibility.
Last Edit: August 24, 2019, 11:30:34 PM by MS
 


Re: Tips for buying hardware?
« Reply #16 on: August 25, 2019, 06:52:17 AM »
 

m654321

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@TheDead I mean, together we could make a difference
Yes, that's the only way progress on the environment will happen - us all collectively working together. The environment (pollution, habitat loss, climate change & energy consumption) has to be the biggest issue for the planet - well done Greta Thunberg for raising global awareness!

Quote
but ultimately, I think there are bigger concerns than one PC eating up this extra bit of power
... but it's a question of scale, is it not? By that I mean if everyone on the planet, who has a "PC eating up this extra bit of power", that means a lot of extra power when scaled-up, planet-wise. It's a sobering thought that computing alone makes up 10% of the total energy consumption on the planet - that's enormous and that % will grow, as more and more societies on the globe become increasingly digital. To work together, we need to think globally - you & me. Also, inbuilt obsolesence by Microsoft of hardware running Windows OS should be made illegal - it generates environmental pollution, plastic & electronics waste. Most of the population don't know that the slow PCs they chuck out can be resurrected with Linux ...  You and I do but we only represent 3% of the PC user population. 

I'll get off my soapbox now  :-[ 
I just feel very strongly about the throw-away society we live in and the issues that are raised as a consequence of that, but its also linked to choices about buying shiny new or reusing old when it comes to computers ...
Last Edit: August 26, 2019, 02:49:19 AM by m654321
Linux-user since 2014. 64bit OS installed in Legacy mode on MBR (msdos/ext4) formatted SSDs (except the pi which uses a micro SDHC card):
2017 - Raspberry pi 3B (4cores) ~ Arm710@1.2GHz - LibreElec, used for upgrading our Samsung TV (excellent for the task)  
2012 - Lenovo G580 2689 (2cores; 4threads] ~ i3-3110M - LL3.8/Win8.1 dual-boot (LL working smoothly)
2011 - Samsung NP-N145 Plus (1core; 2threads) ~ Intel Atom N455@1.66GHz - Slitaz5 rolling 32-bit
2008 - Asus X71Q (2cores) ~ Intel T3200@2.0GHz - LL4.4/Win8.1 dual-boot (LL working beautifully)
2007 - Dell Latitude D630 (2cores) ~ Intel T7100@1.8GHz - LL3.8/Win8.1 dual-boot (LL really zippy!) - my daily driver  :-)
 

Re: Tips for buying hardware?
« Reply #17 on: August 26, 2019, 12:42:29 AM »
 

MS

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Primo, this:
'@TheDead (...) I mean, together we could make a difference'
or this:
'@TheDead
I mean, together we could make a difference'


Other primo: ecology is important, but so is balance. Balance of the mind, balance of the wallet, balance in the push towards optimization. Hyperoptimisation leads to issues comparable to underperformance. Going too far any direction could be detrimental. We are what we are. We are not even a planetary civilization yet, but struggle in that direction. Real global concerns could be dealt with no sooner than we become a global civilization. Otherwise, it is part time solution, which means, the best we can do, is to keep our backyard tidy.

Back on the more mainline subject:

When it comes to buying a new PC, I assume nobody from among the casual consumers, buys anything to dry run a bare bones operating system. Everybody buys a PC with a goal in mind, which is, to run a particular piece of software. Therefore, the PC must be matched to handle given piece of software, which in my opinion is the way to go. Which is why, if someone expects to be a gamer and then buys a consumer grade machine, there could be a dissonance. Likewise, if someone expects a friendly world of ready solutions and chooses Linux or BSD, there could be a dissonance. Consumer grade laptops aim at the usage of Internet browser with statistically most popular services in mind, from what I understand. Basically, any preinstalled software on given machine should be available to execute in high-quality with acceptable outcome. Which is why, for example, AMD was adding a free DOOM [2016] copy once as a bonus, if someone bought their newest - by then - R9 graphical accelerator. It is intuitive the rest of the machine should also play along the chosen standard.

Compared to the PC gaming world, the gaming consoles make for a lot less of electro-trash effectively, with the upgrade pressure being lower and one generation of gaming consoles lasting a good handful of years. Besides, in case of gaming consoles, it is guaranteed every piece of software presented as available, should indeed be available to simply have a go, while in the PC gaming world, it is highly not as simple as that, with some compatibility issues included, but even if to assume everything to be stable, the continuum of requirements is a great motor for the upgrade pressure. Understandably, this corresponds with either the presence or lack of user frustration. While it is true that in the end of lifetime phase for given generation of gaming consoles, the new games look far inferior compared to their PC versions potential, eventually things even out - with patience - as thanks to the retro-compatibility, new gaming consoles can play older games in better standard.

But I praise what I know not, speaking of the gaming consoles, so it is theory. But I know PC gaming no luck.

For choosing Linux as a default operating system, I think Linux is a great movement, but Linux as a system, has a problem. Namely, it is pathologically being itself.
Last Edit: August 26, 2019, 03:27:38 AM by MS
 

Re: Tips for buying hardware?
« Reply #18 on: August 27, 2019, 09:30:54 AM »
 

MS

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Having spoken of cars, there is a peculiar rule I would apply if wanting to purchase a new machine, in particular if to talk about non-sports cars. That is the rule of "0.07". In order to apply, simply divide the horsepower by the mass of the car ready to drive - expressed in kilograms - increased by about one hundred extra of margin. If the result is below "0.07", the car is likely not to have sufficient drive dynamics.

EDIT:

Having spoken of infrastructure, I thought, what is the synonym for that word, what does it mean? It is connectivity. Interestingly, we could talk about "brain infrastructire", the measure of ability to associate.

PS.

Such as, one could say: "this enterprise has impressive connectivity" - or - "you have good Internet infrastructure here". Unnecessarily though these match exactly.

And I say, yes, research of infrastructure does matter when choosing hardware to buy. If someone buys a PC for gaming, specs alone matter little in case there are severe disadvantages unrelated to bare metal.
Last Edit: August 27, 2019, 10:31:23 AM by MS
 

Re: Tips for buying hardware?
« Reply #19 on: August 28, 2019, 08:58:42 AM »
 

TheDead

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For PC:
For gaming, I always suggest used hardware because for most of my friends (no, not the "professionals").
But they are hurdles, for example nVidia blocks using cheap mining GPU, but works when you know how.
See Linus here:


Speaking about cars. I find it sad that they have not developped an Hydrogen system yet.
With all the water on earth and infinite sunlight (to do the electolysis) you have the all the fuel needed, ever.
Burning hydrogen results in heat and water... polution 99% solved.They says hydrogen can exploded, blah blah, like using dead dinosaurs juice is the only way to go ;)Pretty sure they could find a way will all the brain power available.

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Re: Tips for buying hardware?
« Reply #20 on: August 28, 2019, 09:44:17 AM »
 

MS

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Thing to consider: automatic gearbox effectively makes for a loss of up to fifteen units of horsepower, but if someone can afford a car with an automatic gearbox, they can probably also afford a version with enhanced engine, unless the model comes at narrow array of options. Another thing to consider, active air conditioning does affect the car dynamics, therefore, in case of horsepower shortage, it may come in handy to temporarily disable the air conditioning in case of overtaking.
Last Edit: August 28, 2019, 10:20:50 AM by MS
 

Re: Tips for buying hardware?
« Reply #21 on: September 29, 2019, 02:02:06 AM »
 

MS

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Lately I thought that I could use some extra RAM and it came out it is feasible with the laptop I have to expand with a built-in module. Even though few people would probably choose to upgrade their laptop, though if someone is fairly satisfied with what they have and does not plan to switch an entire set anytime soon, upgrading the RAM could be an option to gain some speed. Which is why, when buying a laptop, it is good to check on how much RAM slots does it have, as well as how much total RAM capacity can it support.

I saw the SSD is also upgradable, but this could mean having to replace the default module, instead of adding to it, which is rather unprofitable if everything works as promised.

EDIT:

Saw this movie, quite useful. Someone in the comment section points out the first thing to do after accessing the bowels is to disconnect the battery. The guy in the video mentions that dual channel RAM could enhance certain behaviours of the processor, even if it is 2*4GB instead of 1*8GB. If to look forward to upgrade, though, 1*8GB is a better option, since 2*4GB may fit for a complete replacement, depending on expectations.



PS. But actually, it should be possible to buy a more moderate laptop next time and simply boost it with the older RAM, if that makes it for the better.

If done too early, it could bust your warranty though, in case it applies.
Last Edit: September 29, 2019, 06:52:32 AM by MS
 

Re: Tips for buying hardware?
« Reply #22 on: September 29, 2019, 11:20:35 AM »
 

TheDead

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Opening a laptop can be quite an adventure.
If there is no upgrade ports under said laptop, I would NOT recommend a "normal" user doing this, at all.
I spent 2+ hours one time to open (well dissasemble...) an HP laptop just to clean the fans and I open laptops frequently.
Other laptops, you have to remove frame, keyboard, etc. just to add memory. Some laptop conceptual engineers should be fired sometimes. :-/
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Re: Tips for buying hardware?
« Reply #23 on: September 29, 2019, 04:23:12 PM »
 

MS

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Opening a laptop can be quite an adventure.
If there is no upgrade ports under said laptop, I would NOT recommend a "normal" user doing this, at all.
I spent 2+ hours one time to open (well dissasemble...) an HP laptop just to clean the fans and I open laptops frequently.
Other laptops, you have to remove frame, keyboard, etc. just to add memory. Some laptop conceptual engineers should be fired sometimes. :-/

There must be a reason to it. My guess is that statistically, laptops are perhaps upgraded marginally compared to the desktops, as well as stereotypical laptop users are less techy involved, compared to the desktop users. Which is why, for the costs of manufacturing complex parts, as well as making a design to enable easy upgrading, it was discarded. I do not even know really if there are any laptops nowadays having any easy upgrade access ports. Similar as with cars. Mind majority of modern cars resemble a ball more than a rectangle. This comes due to interior ergonomics calculations, meaning, it is easier to build a smaller car that can contain more, this way, using less materials at the same time. Optimization.

EDIT:

When it comes to the warranty, it is good to respect it. My 'Inspiron 15-5567' was at the warranty service two times before it could be considered good to go. They replaced the fan and then the motherboard. Think if I had to pay for it myself. Some could argue this is the reason to choose the used equipment instead. Well, used equipment is not equally good to everyone, depends on how much does one know what one is actually buying and what are the possible quirks, which could emerge time soon in the future, specific to the hardware.
Last Edit: September 29, 2019, 05:03:44 PM by MS
 

Re: Tips for buying hardware?
« Reply #24 on: October 05, 2019, 08:11:34 AM »
 

MS

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Speaking of the second warranty service, it was particularly hard to negotiate for, since BIOS scan did not detect any malfunction - while my claim was that the memory card slot had been unresponsive. In the end, they agreed to accept the machine for yet another service and it came out, I was right. It took them to replace the motherboard, as probably it was the most swift solution, without having to dig too much into the problem. The lesson coming from this experience is to manually test the machine in every available direction, since automated scans may simply fail to notice, being brief and overly shallow. Which is also why the less the components altogether, the less the hassle.
Last Edit: October 05, 2019, 02:25:40 PM by MS
 


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