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General => Off Topic => Topic started by: Moltke on November 23, 2017, 09:11:07 PM

Title: Adult Learning Model; when struggling learning Linux.
Post by: Moltke on November 23, 2017, 09:11:07 PM
Hi everyone! Hope you're all having a nice life! :)
I was re-reading this book (https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/11397703-the-mental-game-of-poker) today and thought of sharing this particular piece which I think might come very handy for those times when you -we - are struggling at learning Linux and think "how a noob I am" "this is frustrating" or somethink like that, so instead of aknowledging what we already learned we focus on the things we don't know...yet, and how these things are keeping us from getting the results we want, and here's when the frustation feeling starts. I think this might help you to understand and develope your particular way of learning:   
"When learning a particular skill, the process is predictable and has a distinct start and finish. While people differ in the unique aspects of learning, such as how quickly they learn, what comes easily to them, and where they get stuck, the overall process is exactly the same.
The ďAdult Learning Model Ē (ALM) is a straightforward theory that defines the four distinct levels of the learning process. The four levels are:

Level 1 ó Unconscious Incompetence. You donít even know what you donít know. In other words, youíre blind to the ways that you lack skill.
Level 2 ó Conscious Incompetence. Now youíve become conscious of what you donít know. But that doesnít make you skilled, it just means you know what skills you need to improve. Becoming conscious happens from either your own insight or insight that is shared with you by someone else.
Level 3 ó Conscious Competence. If youíve reached this level, it means youíve done some work and/or have had enough repetition to gain some skill. The only catch is that in order to be skilled, you need to think about what youíve learned ... otherwise, you return to being incompetent.
Level 4 ó Unconscious Competence. At this level, youíve learned something so well that it is now totally automatic and requires no thinking. Unconscious Competence is the Holy Grail of learning.
 A familiar example that shows the ALM in action is learning to drive a car. Remember when you were a small child thinking about driving a car. You barely knew what a car was, let alone how to drive one. This is Unconscious Incompetence. Then as a teenager, you became much more aware of driving and perhaps were frustrated by the fact that you couldnít drive. You became conscious of your incompetence. Now think back to when you got behind the wheel for the first time. In order to drive a car, you first needed to learn how to: steer, step on the gas, watch the road, and change the radio station all at the same time; parallel park; adjust to the speed of highway traffic; and deal with thousands of unique situations. Then, you needed to concentrate and think about all of these things so you didnít kill yourself or others. This is Conscious Competence. After driving for years, you no longer think about every single action needed to drive a car; your skill comes naturally and with little effort. You can handle driving, listening to music, talking to passengers, and extreme situations that arise, such as adverse weather, all without much thought. Driving is a skill now trained to the level of Unconscious Competence."
I think that having this piece of information can prove to be very helpful not only regarding learning Linux but anything else in our lives, specially when it comes to solving problems/situations that demands the most of us.
Well, I hope you find this post at the very least informative as well as helpful. And remember; we're all learning new stuff everyday and this is particularlly true when it comes to Linux.
Title: Re: Adult Learning Model; when struggling learning Linux.
Post by: Artim on November 24, 2017, 05:32:37 AM
I keep a journal of things that went awry, what I did to fix them, what worked and what didn't.  It has been helpful sometimes in helping me to not repeat mistakes.  I just need to organize my notes some way, instead of rummaging through the whole journal just to find that one thing I did right..

Not only that, but some of the fixes have actually changed since I started!  That kinda makes it more confusing.

It's still fun though!
Title: Re: Adult Learning Model; when struggling learning Linux.
Post by: Moltke on November 24, 2017, 06:32:33 AM
I keep a journal of things that went awry, what I did to fix them, what worked and what didn't.  It has been helpful sometimes in helping me to not repeat mistakes.  I just need to organize my notes some way, instead of rummaging through the whole journal just to find that one thing I did right..

Not only that, but some of the fixes have actually changed since I started!  That kinda makes it more confusing.

It's still fun though!

Hi @RandomBoy
I do something like that too but instead of notes I take screenshots and copy/paste commands. I'm starting to record videos of the procedures too cause I think it's a practical way for reviewing in a more comprehensive and detailed way what I did step by step. Of course, this approach only works if I can use my dektop, for those times when I can't, I gotta admit most of the them I do nothing to keep a record of what I did to solve whatever issue I was dealing with, if it worked or didn't.