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Software - Support => Installing Software => Topic started by: Jerry on May 19, 2016, 05:48:43 AM

Title: SystemD - Linux Lite Guide
Post by: Jerry on May 19, 2016, 05:48:43 AM
Source - https://www.linux.com/learn/cleaning-your-linux-startup-process (https://www.linux.com/learn/cleaning-your-linux-startup-process)

Show which services are taking the longest to start up.

Code: [Select]
jerry@jerry-VirtualBox:~$ systemd-analyze blame
          5.260s NetworkManager-wait-online.service
           725ms nmbd.service
           645ms samba-ad-dc.service
           635ms lvm2-monitor.service
           623ms dev-sda1.device
           492ms ufw.service
           420ms ModemManager.service
           411ms smbd.service
           393ms systemd-logind.service
           391ms accounts-daemon.service
           327ms networking.service
           253ms NetworkManager.service
           250ms virtualbox-guest-utils.service
           229ms ondemand.service
           228ms apparmor.service
           207ms irqbalance.service
           183ms grub-common.service
           177ms lightdm.service
           166ms lm-sensors.service
           158ms console-kit-log-system-start.service
           134ms gpu-manager.service
           117ms udisks2.service
           110ms systemd-udev-trigger.service
           108ms thermald.service
            97ms console-kit-daemon.service
            94ms console-setup.service
            92ms systemd-udevd.service
            90ms avahi-daemon.service
            90ms upower.service
            84ms systemd-modules-load.service
            72ms plymouth-start.service
            62ms rsyslog.service
            54ms systemd-journald.service
            52ms user@1000.service
            51ms polkitd.service
            46ms systemd-tmpfiles-setup.service
            43ms ubiquity.service
            36ms systemd-tmpfiles-setup-dev.service
            36ms hddtemp.service
            33ms systemd-update-utmp.service
            25ms systemd-journal-flush.service
            23ms pppd-dns.service
            23ms systemd-hostnamed.service
            20ms systemd-user-sessions.service
            19ms dev-hugepages.mount
            19ms dns-clean.service
            18ms rtkit-daemon.service
            18ms plymouth-read-write.service
            17ms sys-kernel-debug.mount
            17ms dev-disk-by\x2duuid-0994cbe3\x2df958\x2d4b7d\x2d9fd4\x2d4f9149dcf127.swap
            15ms kmod-static-nodes.service
            14ms systemd-sysctl.service
            14ms resolvconf.service
            12ms systemd-update-utmp-runlevel.service
            10ms systemd-remount-fs.service
            10ms dev-mqueue.mount
             8ms sys-fs-fuse-connections.mount
             7ms systemd-random-seed.service
             5ms openvpn.service
             3ms rc-local.service
             2ms plymouth-quit-wait.service

List enabled boot services:

Code: [Select]
jerry@jerry-VirtualBox:~$ systemctl list-unit-files --type=service | grep enabled
accounts-daemon.service                    enabled
autovt@.service                            enabled
avahi-daemon.service                       enabled
bluetooth.service                          enabled
casper.service                             enabled
cgmanager.service                          enabled
cgproxy.service                            enabled
cron.service                               enabled
cups-browsed.service                       enabled
cups.service                               enabled
dbus-org.bluez.service                     enabled
dbus-org.freedesktop.Avahi.service         enabled
dbus-org.freedesktop.ModemManager1.service enabled
dbus-org.freedesktop.nm-dispatcher.service enabled
dbus-org.freedesktop.thermald.service      enabled
display-manager.service                    enabled
dns-clean.service                          enabled
friendly-recovery.service                  enabled
getty@.service                             enabled
gpu-manager.service                        enabled
lightdm.service                            enabled
lm-sensors.service                         enabled
lvm2-monitor.service                       enabled
ModemManager.service                       enabled
network-manager.service                    enabled
networking.service                         enabled
NetworkManager-dispatcher.service          enabled
NetworkManager-wait-online.service         enabled
NetworkManager.service                     enabled
openvpn.service                            enabled
pppd-dns.service                           enabled
resolvconf.service                         enabled
rsyslog.service                            enabled
syslog.service                             enabled
systemd-timesyncd.service                  enabled
thermald.service                           enabled
ubiquity.service                           enabled
ufw.service                                enabled
unattended-upgrades.service                enabled
ureadahead.service                         enabled
jerry@jerry-VirtualBox:~$

Stop a service (needs both the stop and disable flag)
eg. If you don't have or need Bluetooth:

Code: [Select]
sudo systemctl stop bluetooth.service
sudo systemctl disable bluetooth.service

Confirm the service has been stopped:

Code: [Select]
jerry@jerry-VirtualBox:~$ systemctl status bluetooth.service
● bluetooth.service - Bluetooth service
   Loaded: loaded (/lib/systemd/system/bluetooth.service; disabled; vendor preset: enabled)
   Active: inactive (dead)
     Docs: man:bluetoothd(

May 19 21:33:04 jerry-VirtualBox systemd[1]: Stopped Bluetooth service.
jerry@jerry-VirtualBox:~$

A disabled service can be started by another service. If you really want it dead, without uninstalling it, then you can mask it to prevent it from starting under any circumstances:

Code: [Select]
jerry@jerry-VirtualBox:~$ sudo systemctl mask bluetooth.service
Created symlink from /etc/systemd/system/bluetooth.service to /dev/null.
jerry@jerry-VirtualBox:~$

Generate a list of all services:

Code: [Select]
jerry@jerry-VirtualBox:~$ systemctl list-unit-files --type=service
UNIT FILE                                  STATE   
accounts-daemon.service                    enabled
acpid.service                              disabled
alsa-restore.service                       static 
alsa-state.service                         static 
alsa-utils.service                         masked 
apt-daily.service                          static 
autovt@.service                            enabled
avahi-daemon.service                       enabled
bluetooth.service                          masked 
bootlogd.service                           masked 
bootlogs.service                           masked 
bootmisc.service                           masked 
casper.service                             enabled
cgmanager.service                          enabled
cgproxy.service                            enabled
checkfs.service                            masked 
checkroot-bootclean.service                masked 
checkroot.service                          masked 
colord.service                             static 
console-getty.service                      disabled
console-kit-daemon.service                 disabled
console-kit-log-system-restart.service     static 
console-kit-log-system-start.service       static 
console-kit-log-system-stop.service        static 
console-setup.service                      static 
console-shell.service                      disabled
container-getty@.service                   static 
cron.service                               enabled
cryptdisks-early.service                   masked 
cryptdisks.service                         masked 
cups-browsed.service                       enabled
cups.service                               enabled
dbus-org.freedesktop.Avahi.service         enabled
dbus-org.freedesktop.hostname1.service     static 
dbus-org.freedesktop.locale1.service       static 
dbus-org.freedesktop.login1.service        static 
dbus-org.freedesktop.ModemManager1.service enabled
dbus-org.freedesktop.network1.service      disabled
dbus-org.freedesktop.nm-dispatcher.service enabled
dbus-org.freedesktop.resolve1.service      disabled
dbus-org.freedesktop.thermald.service      enabled
dbus-org.freedesktop.timedate1.service     static 
dbus.service                               static 
debug-shell.service                        disabled
display-manager.service                    enabled
dm-event.service                           disabled
dns-clean.service                          enabled
emergency.service                          static 
friendly-recovery.service                  enabled
fuse.service                               masked 
getty-static.service                       static 
getty@.service                             enabled
gpu-manager.service                        enabled
halt.service                               masked 
hostname.service                           masked 
hwclock.service                            masked 
ifup@.service                              static 
initrd-cleanup.service                     static 
initrd-parse-etc.service                   static 
initrd-switch-root.service                 static 
initrd-udevadm-cleanup-db.service          static 
killprocs.service                          masked 
kmod-static-nodes.service                  static 
kmod.service                               static 
lightdm.service                            enabled
lm-sensors.service                         enabled
lvm2-lvmetad.service                       disabled
lvm2-lvmpolld.service                      disabled
lvm2-monitor.service                       enabled
lvm2-pvscan@.service                       static 
lvm2.service                               masked 
ModemManager.service                       enabled
module-init-tools.service                  static 
motd.service                               masked 
mountall-bootclean.service                 masked 
mountall.service                           masked 
mountdevsubfs.service                      masked 
mountkernfs.service                        masked 
mountnfs-bootclean.service                 masked 
mountnfs.service                           masked 
network-manager.service                    enabled
networking.service                         enabled
NetworkManager-dispatcher.service          enabled
NetworkManager-wait-online.service         enabled
NetworkManager.service                     enabled
openvpn.service                            enabled
openvpn@.service                           disabled
plymouth-halt.service                      static 
plymouth-kexec.service                     static 
plymouth-log.service                       static 
plymouth-poweroff.service                  static 
plymouth-quit-wait.service                 static 
plymouth-quit.service                      static 
plymouth-read-write.service                static 
plymouth-reboot.service                    static 
plymouth-start.service                     static 
plymouth-switch-root.service               static 
plymouth.service                           static 
polkitd.service                            static 
pppd-dns.service                           enabled
procps.service                             static 
quotaon.service                            static 
rc-local.service                           static 
rc.local.service                           static 
rc.service                                 masked 
rcS.service                                masked 
reboot.service                             masked 
rescue.service                             static 
resolvconf.service                         enabled
rmnologin.service                          masked 
rsync.service                              disabled
rsyslog.service                            enabled
rtkit-daemon.service                       disabled
samba.service                              masked 
saned.service                              masked 
saned@.service                             indirect
sendsigs.service                           masked 
serial-getty@.service                      disabled
sigpwr-container-shutdown.service          static 
single.service                             masked 
stop-bootlogd-single.service               masked 
stop-bootlogd.service                      masked 
syslog.service                             enabled
systemd-ask-password-console.service       static 
systemd-ask-password-plymouth.service      static 
systemd-ask-password-wall.service          static 
systemd-backlight@.service                 static 
systemd-binfmt.service                     static 
systemd-bootchart.service                  disabled
systemd-bus-proxyd.service                 static 
systemd-exit.service                       static 
systemd-fsck-root.service                  static 
systemd-fsck@.service                      static 
systemd-fsckd.service                      static 
systemd-halt.service                       static 
systemd-hibernate-resume@.service          static 
systemd-hibernate.service                  static 
systemd-hostnamed.service                  static 
systemd-hwdb-update.service                static 
systemd-hybrid-sleep.service               static 
systemd-initctl.service                    static 
systemd-journal-flush.service              static 
systemd-journald.service                   static 
systemd-kexec.service                      static 
systemd-localed.service                    static 
systemd-logind.service                     static 
systemd-machine-id-commit.service          static 
systemd-modules-load.service               static 
systemd-networkd-resolvconf-update.service static 
systemd-networkd-wait-online.service       disabled
systemd-networkd.service                   disabled
systemd-poweroff.service                   static 
systemd-quotacheck.service                 static 
systemd-random-seed.service                static 
systemd-reboot.service                     static 
systemd-remount-fs.service                 static 
systemd-resolved.service                   disabled
systemd-rfkill.service                     static 
systemd-suspend.service                    static 
systemd-sysctl.service                     static 
systemd-timedated.service                  static 
systemd-timesyncd.service                  enabled
systemd-tmpfiles-clean.service             static 
systemd-tmpfiles-setup-dev.service         static 
systemd-tmpfiles-setup.service             static 
systemd-udev-settle.service                static 
systemd-udev-trigger.service               static 
systemd-udevd.service                      static 
systemd-update-utmp-runlevel.service       static 
systemd-update-utmp.service                static 
systemd-user-sessions.service              static 
thermald.service                           enabled
ubiquity.service                           enabled
udev-configure-printer@.service            static 
udev.service                               static 
udisks2.service                            disabled
ufw.service                                enabled
umountfs.service                           masked 
umountnfs.service                          masked 
umountroot.service                         masked 
unattended-upgrades.service                enabled
upower.service                             disabled
urandom.service                            static 
ureadahead-stop.service                    static 
ureadahead.service                         enabled
usb_modeswitch@.service                    static 
usbmuxd.service                            static 
user@.service                              static 
uuidd.service                              indirect
wacom-inputattach@.service                 static 
wpa_supplicant.service                     disabled
x11-common.service                         masked 

192 unit files listed.

Poweroff:

Code: [Select]
sudo systemctl poweroff
Restart:

Code: [Select]
sudo systemctl reboot
Creating a very basic systemd service file:

Code: [Select]
sudo touch /lib/systemd/system/myservicename.service
Code: [Select]
sudo nano /lib/systemd/system/myservicename.service
Code: [Select]
[Unit]
Description=A brief description of my application
# Wants - other service required to run this service
Wants=network.target
# After - start my service after this service
After=network.target

[Service]
User=jerry
RemainAfterExit=yes
ExecStart=/usr/bin/myapplication
Restart=on-failure

[Install]
WantedBy=multi-user.target

Start the service.

Code: [Select]
sudo systemctl daemon-reload
Code: [Select]
sudo systemctl start myservicename.service
Title: Re: SystemD - Linux Lite Guide
Post by: Jerry on May 19, 2016, 05:53:54 AM
Tip - using a static IP should improve your boot time. If you use DHCP, it takes longer to boot as your machine has to be assigned an IP address.
Title: Re: SystemD - Linux Lite Guide
Post by: Wirezfree on May 19, 2016, 07:13:29 AM
@Jerry
You must be telepathic :)
I was reading up on systemd about the stopping/starting services.
I used to have my XP set-ups fine tuned to only run absolute minimal services.
nice summary
Title: Re: SystemD - Linux Lite Guide
Post by: Jerry on May 19, 2016, 07:22:37 AM
I used to disable many services on Windows too. Now I'm looking for some easy to use software that lists all the services and allows you to enable/disable/mask them. If anyone finds some software, please let me know.
Title: Re: SystemD - Linux Lite Guide
Post by: Wirezfree on May 19, 2016, 11:24:29 AM
Is this what you mean.?
(http://i.imgur.com/BSzW1pW.png)

Code: [Select]
sudo apt-get install bum

Not quite the same.?
But you can also get to see "possible hidden" Startup applications by running:
Code: [Select]
sudo sed -i 's/NoDisplay=true/NoDisplay=false/g' /etc/xdg/autostart/*.desktop

(http://i.imgur.com/O2eJMcd.png)


I don't really need to tell you... But
All need using with caution...!!!
Title: Re: SystemD - Linux Lite Guide
Post by: Jerry on May 19, 2016, 11:37:07 AM
Thanks Dave. I found one. Google systemd-ui.

Sent from my phone using Tapatalk

Title: Re: SystemD - Linux Lite Guide
Post by: Wirezfree on May 19, 2016, 01:24:20 PM
Looks good... book marked
Title: Re: SystemD - Linux Lite Guide
Post by: nomko on May 25, 2016, 09:19:35 AM
I found one. Google systemd-ui.
You mean this: https://launchpad.net/ubuntu/+source/systemd-ui?
And this: https://packages.debian.org/nl/jessie/systemd-ui?
Title: Re: SystemD - Linux Lite Guide
Post by: Jerry on May 25, 2016, 09:56:48 AM
Yes.
Title: Re: SystemD - Linux Lite Guide
Post by: liamjake05 on May 25, 2016, 12:24:24 PM
Thanks Dave. I found one. Google systemd-ui.

Sent from my phone using Tapatalk

How do you install it?
Title: Re: SystemD - Linux Lite Guide
Post by: Wirezfree on May 25, 2016, 12:44:39 PM

@llamjake05

Code: [Select]
sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install systemd-ui

In Menu start to type system, and select "systemadm"
Title: Re: SystemD - Linux Lite Guide
Post by: Jerry on May 26, 2016, 08:20:53 PM
I've built packages for Linux Lite 3.0 for this application, it looks the easiest to use:

https://github.com/mmstick/systemd-manager (https://github.com/mmstick/systemd-manager)

Code: [Select]
sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get install systemd-manager -y
I won't include it by default just yet in 3.0 as I'm worried inexperienced users will bork their system.

(http://i.imgur.com/8LOCJCy.png)

Menu, System, Systemd Manager
Title: Re: SystemD - Linux Lite Guide
Post by: Jerry on May 27, 2016, 01:09:36 AM
I've talked to the developer, and he's happy to entertain sensible suggestions for this application. If you have any suggestions, please put them in this thread. Thank you :)
Title: Re: SystemD - Linux Lite Guide
Post by: nomko on May 27, 2016, 04:27:35 AM
 
I've talked to the developer, and he's happy to entertain sensible suggestions for this application. If you have any suggestions, please put them in this thread. Thank you :)


My first opinion after glazing at that screenshot you posted: make the description easier to understand. No difficult languages, no hard-to-read abracadabra. Just plain, simple, easy to read and understand explanation for any "dummy". Too much difficult and technical stuff will scare of the inexperienced user.






Title: Re: SystemD - Linux Lite Guide
Post by: Wirezfree on May 27, 2016, 07:28:26 AM
@nomko

This is a dilemma, the tool allows users to enable and disable certain services, by it's nature it is technical.
With no disrespect to you(or other users) unless you fully understand the "technical" impact(implication) of enabling/disabling certain things you could break your install, or stop it booting.
You may think "oh that looks O.K to disable, but something else may rely on that service." It needs to be used with caution.

just my own thoughts/comments...
Title: Re: SystemD - Linux Lite Guide
Post by: Jerry on May 27, 2016, 07:29:43 AM
Spot on Dave :)
Title: Re: SystemD - Linux Lite Guide
Post by: liamjake05 on May 29, 2016, 10:48:49 AM
Add this application in Lite Software and what about making a basic and an advanced version off Linux Lite. Inexperienced users will download the basic version while experts download the advanced version.
Title: Re: SystemD - Linux Lite Guide
Post by: nomko on May 30, 2016, 03:51:34 AM
@nomko

This is a dilemma, the tool allows users to enable and disable certain services, by it's nature it is technical.
With no disrespect to you(or other users) unless you fully understand the "technical" impact(implication) of enabling/disabling certain things you could break your install, or stop it booting.
You may think "oh that looks O.K to disable, but something else may rely on that service." It needs to be used with caution.

That's what i ment. By making the explanation more "dummy" proof these mistakes can be avoided. With too much technical abracadabra and a lesser understanding the mistake is made easier. If the explanation was made in such way that it also shows which applications rely on which service, it can be prevented that some system dependent services are shut down with unwanted results. Or, when turning off a service, some pop-up dialog box appears informing the users that the service they try to shut down is also required for application (...). It can be done easily. But i agree with you that any change has to be done with precaution, experienced user or not.
Title: Re: SystemD - Linux Lite Guide
Post by: Wirezfree on May 30, 2016, 04:58:07 AM
@nomko

Again, it's not that simple...
Let's assume a clean install of LL out of the box as 50 services running, so that 50 lots of dev time to re-write what they do in "plain English", times that by each language.?
Then the dev's have to work out all the interdependency's, just for the standard ones, how much time is that.??

Now you have your clean install, and start installing other programs, some of which will have services, who is going to re-write those in simple terms.?
The LL devs have no idea what users are going to install, they can't re-write every explanation for every service.?
Then you have the interdependency's, who going to work out all those.?

It would be 100's & 100's of hours of work for the devs.??
I would rather have the devs work on a solid, stable LL itself,
rather than something that will be of interest to a small number of users.


Again, my assessment & take on it.
Title: Re: SystemD - Linux Lite Guide
Post by: trinidad on June 13, 2016, 12:09:02 PM
Normal long message posting boot allows time for several things to take place, fsck, ram and rom flash, cron jobs, ram balancing adjustments on 64bit dual boot systems, dual port boards, one UEFI, other legacy, etc. All of my four personal; machines are setup to boot message post, and any machine that leaves my bench is setup that way. Long boot times before the grub selection screen are safer, even anti-virus can be added, and then you have time to get a cup of coffee. A minute or so extra after, until the chosen OS login screen, is not particularly annoying to me. Boot speed has nothing to do with OS speed. Any linux system on a machine with enough ram 4gig or more, and at least a SATA disk, can be slimmed down and configured to load mostly into ram using Slack tools, and run lightening fast. Fast boot does not mean fast system, and fast system does not always mean hardened system though that is sometimes the case; i/e Debian. The more important question is: How much does the tool in question increase the weight of the system, and is it worth having on that basis? That may be a moot point as well, considering I often encounter windows7 systems using 70gig or more of disk space for the OS itself. The speed improvement of this OS compared to windows10 on the same Dell computer I have in my home for family use is readily evident. Perhaps separating sudo and root, and adding a root choice to the login screen like Kali, would make the tool failsafe, but again this would increase the weight of the system. Best wishes.
Trinidad           
Title: Re: SystemD - Linux Lite Guide
Post by: N4RPS on June 27, 2016, 06:56:14 AM
Hello!

I agree. The LAST thing you'd want to do is to give n00bs fire to play with.

Besides, NOTHING speeds up boot times (and everything else) like an SSD...

73 DE N4RPS
Rob
Title: Re: SystemD - Linux Lite Guide
Post by: Jerry on July 05, 2016, 05:42:27 AM
Added a how-to create a systemd service to original post.
Title: Re: SystemD - Linux Lite Guide
Post by: N4RPS on July 05, 2016, 05:25:55 PM
Hello!

My first opinion after glazing at that screenshot you posted: make the description easier to understand. No difficult languages, no hard-to-read abracadabra. Just plain, simple, easy to read and understand explanation for any "dummy". Too much difficult and technical stuff will scare off the inexperienced user.

That's the idea.

Turn THIS loose on some n00bs, and you'll have people trashing their installs left and right - most of the time, without even realizing what they're doing.

In MY case, guilty as charged. After all, why do you think I say, "Knows just enough about Linux to be DANGEROUS"???

73 DE N4RPS
Rob
Title: Re: SystemD - Linux Lite Guide
Post by: Jerry on June 09, 2017, 04:03:47 AM
SystemD Manager 1.0.2 for Linux Lite has been updated on our repo.
Title: Re: SystemD - Linux Lite Guide
Post by: Jerry on May 14, 2019, 12:20:03 AM
Not sure if this will go into Lite Tweaks or as a standalone app. Either way, this will make it so easy for people to get us to help them with any start up issues:

(https://i.imgur.com/OGtuybE.gif)
Title: Re: SystemD - Linux Lite Guide
Post by: Wirezfree on May 14, 2019, 06:40:39 AM
Not sure if this will go into Lite Tweaks or as a standalone app. Either way, this will make it so easy for people to get us to help them with any start up issues

Hi Jerry,

Still trying to get my life back together after the loss of my mother..

I periodically take a peak to see what's happening... LL is maturing nicely

Looks good.. Great idea.

It's an old thread where I commented on way back 2016... seems like only yesterday :)
Title: Re: SystemD - Linux Lite Guide
Post by: trinidad on May 15, 2019, 07:56:51 AM
I like it Jerry. Seems to fit with the LL philosophy: something that would not seem foreign to Windows users in its similarity to Microsoft Common Console applications. The systemd system manager for Debian always reminded me of those same MSC applications in Windows.

TC
Title: Re: SystemD - Linux Lite Guide
Post by: Jerry on May 15, 2019, 08:03:01 AM

Hi Jerry,

Still trying to get my life back together after the loss of my mother..

I periodically take a peak to see what's happening... LL is maturing nicely

Looks good.. Great idea.

It's an old thread where I commented on way back 2016... seems like only yesterday :)


Great to have you around again :)
Title: Re: SystemD - Linux Lite Guide
Post by: Jerry on May 15, 2019, 08:14:17 AM
I like it Jerry. Seems to fit with the LL philosophy: something that would not seem foreign to Windows users in its similarity to Microsoft Common Console applications. The systemd system manager for Debian always reminded me of those same MSC applications in Windows.

TC

Thanks TC. I look for gaps in point and click configuration and try to fill them as simple as possible.
Title: Re: SystemD - Linux Lite Guide
Post by: Wirezfree on May 15, 2019, 08:45:37 AM

Hi Jerry,

Still trying to get my life back together after the loss of my mother..

I periodically take a peak to see what's happening... LL is maturing nicely

Looks good.. Great idea.

It's an old thread where I commented on way back 2016... seems like only yesterday :)


Great to have you around again :)

Hopefully will start to frequent a bit more often...

It's been just over 5 years since I registered on the forum
Title: Re: SystemD - Linux Lite Guide
Post by: ejc on June 10, 2019, 08:51:17 AM
Hello, I use an Asus eeebox 1501b with 2 go ram and i notice that the unity gets warm quickly after boot and stays so.
Anything I can fix here:

Memory Usage: 1330/1993MB (66.73%)
Disk Usage: 12/293GB (5%)
with just the default pdf reader open and firefox

  17.567s dev-sda1.device
         16.051s ufw.service
         15.079s keyboard-setup.service
         15.027s lvm2-monitor.service
         14.793s systemd-journal-flush.service
         14.598s systemd-modules-load.service
         14.516s systemd-tmpfiles-setup-dev.service
          6.590s NetworkManager-wait-online.service
          3.413s swapfile.swap
          3.169s udisks2.service
          2.718s NetworkManager.service
          2.682s networkd-dispatcher.service
          2.498s accounts-daemon.service
          2.289s ModemManager.service
          2.126s grub-common.service
          2.029s fstrim.service
          2.017s nmbd.service
          1.983s systemd-random-seed.service
          1.878s preload.service
          1.833s motd-news.service
          1.804s plymouth-quit-wait.service
          1.801s lightdm.service
          1.747s wpa_supplicant.service


Title: Re: SystemD - Linux Lite Guide
Post by: TheDead on June 11, 2019, 07:48:07 AM
Hi,

(Throwing some ideas post :-) )

I agree that this should be included in Lite Tweaks, maybe in an advanced or in a special "Diagnostics" section / module?
But, to make it more user flriendly, I would add some "Info" text in the program though, just above the buttons on the main window.

I push new Linux users to click and try everything so opening the tool with a text saying what is does would help guide/teach users.
Maybe, something like :
"This tool helps diagnose startup issues related to SystemD. SystemD provides a standard process for controlling what programs run when a Linux system boots up."

Now that I think about it, I would find this helpful in a lot of "specialized" applications, but that could be the noob in me talking. ;)
Title: Re: SystemD - Linux Lite Guide
Post by: TheDead on June 11, 2019, 07:55:45 AM
@ejc

For your , Asus eeebox 1501b, do you know if the harddisk inside is a SSD?
I regularly have problems in laptops and micro PCs (low to no airflow) with a "standard" harddrive getting hot, specially if it's a 7200rpm drive.
(guess this should be moved to a support section though :-S )
Title: Re: SystemD - Linux Lite Guide
Post by: ejc on June 12, 2019, 03:38:40 AM
According to the specs of the Eeebox 1501P
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asus_EeeBox_PC
The HD is a 320 GB SATA @ 5,400 RPM
Title: Re: SystemD - Linux Lite Guide
Post by: Jerry on June 12, 2019, 06:04:39 AM
Please open a support thread, this is a Tutorial. Thanks.
Title: Re: SystemD - Linux Lite Guide
Post by: Rapidrob on December 27, 2019, 10:06:39 AM
Perhaps a list of what can be shut-off for a faster boot up that 99% of users can do without the fear of doing damage to the O.S?
That would be neat for folks like myself.
Title: Re: SystemD - Linux Lite Guide
Post by: firenice03 on December 27, 2019, 10:43:24 AM
@Rapidrob

If you haven't tried and not planning on using VirtualBox..

Performance Tips:

- For start up (boot time) - if you have no plans to run VirtualBox, and you want faster boots, you can remove it's supported additions:
Code: [Select]
sudo apt purge virtualbox*
sudo systemctl stop vboxadd.service
sudo systemctl stop vboxadd-service.service
sudo systemctl disable vboxadd.service
sudo systemctl disable vboxadd-service.service
Menu, Settings, Session and Startup, Application Autostart. Untick vboxclient.

VirtualBox support is included and has always been because this is how many people review an OS before they install it. Having the right support - clipboard, drag & drop, network, graphics etc gives a significantly better impression of an OS's function.

- Setting a static IP address (see the Help Manual) will improve boot times, it's something I've always used myself. Instead of waiting for your router to assign you an IP, the OS already has it set. One less thing for the start up procedure to spend time probing for.

From:
https://www.linuxliteos.com/forums/release-announcements/linux-lite-4-0-final-released/ (https://www.linuxliteos.com/forums/release-announcements/linux-lite-4-0-final-released/)
Title: Re: SystemD - Linux Lite Guide
Post by: TheDead on December 28, 2019, 05:04:31 PM
@firenice03
Hi, thanks for the VirtualBox reminder... I looked around but I didn't see it in Sticky anywhere...

I also just noticed in your sig you had an Atom with SiS?
Maybe you had to use it as a punishment... or lost a dare? :DD
I'm just kidding, but when I work on a "trouble" system with an SiS chipset. I can almost flip a coin that it comes from a SiS "incompatility" of some kind.
Title: Re: SystemD - Linux Lite Guide
Post by: trinidad on December 29, 2019, 10:04:43 AM
@TheDead  VB info was in the release notes. It is stickied.

TC
Title: Re: SystemD - Linux Lite Guide
Post by: firenice03 on December 29, 2019, 12:49:50 PM
@firenice03
Hi, thanks for the VirtualBox reminder... I looked around but I didn't see it in Sticky anywhere...

I also just noticed in your sig you had an Atom with SiS?
Maybe you had to use it as a punishment... or lost a dare? :DD
I'm just kidding, but when I work on a "trouble" system with an SiS chipset. I can almost flip a coin that it comes from a SiS "incompatility" of some kind.



@TheDead
Yes it was in the release notes :)


As for SiS... UGH -- it was what I had, and an early on box too try to "learn" on...
I always found it was a custom/modified xorg.conf..


I have bookmarked.. To remind me LOL
https://www.linuxliteos.com/forums/video-cards/sis-graphic-card-support-(771671-pcie-vga)/ (https://www.linuxliteos.com/forums/video-cards/sis-graphic-card-support-(771671-pcie-vga)/)
https://www.linuxliteos.com/forums/video-cards/sis-671771-issue/ (https://www.linuxliteos.com/forums/video-cards/sis-671771-issue/)


There are probably many other links in the forum for SiS too ... but UGH...
I remember trying a setting, rebooting and having to undo/correct in a tty and try again... I made sure I had backups LOL
Title: Re: SystemD - Linux Lite Guide
Post by: TheDead on January 01, 2020, 03:50:11 AM
@trinidad and @firenice03
Oh, yeah, those release notes thingy. I knew I saw them info's somewhere! (says me with a potato farmer's accent)
Now I feel like the times when you removed those little tags from clothes and then ask yourself if you can put them in the dryer without getting an gnome suit afterwards.

SiS... in the news, they say that they're not nice people, beheading others, etc..... Oh wait... thats another group.
Both can scare people though... ;)