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New installing LinuxLite 6.6 Idk how to partition a new installation without Win

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Şerban S.

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Hi, again!

[...] Yes, the latest Laptops or any computers don't need that (later than 2010)
BUT, the old ones need sometimes a root partition

It is exactly the opposite:

Old computers have a different partitioning system, called "MSDOS".
This limits the amount of storage media to 3 TB and the filesize to 2 GB.
So, if you have a 4 TB drive, you will be able to create only 3 partitions of about 860 GB. The rest will remain "unallocated".
If you try to force the partitioning limit, it will issue an error message.
Further more, you will lose drive speed. The MSDOS partitioning scheme, works slower than the other, regardless the filesystem you choose.
I tested that many times so it's a fact.
There are also specific formatting rules: At the beginning of each physical media (sector 0, cylinder 0 or the equivalent), there is a special section called "MBR" (Master Boot Record).
None of this limitations apply to the UEFI standard.
Among others, as you said, there is another limitation. You can only create 4 primary partitions.
That is why I recommended you the partitioning scheme in the previous posts: all partitions are "Primary":
/dev/sda1, ext4, 20 GB, IS the boot partition, only in the MSDOS partitioning scheme, there is a different set of rules in accessing the info written on the disk.
This is why I said that you do not need a distinct boot partition.
The first one, is by default flagged as "boot".
So, as far as here, we spent our first primary.
/dev/sda2, SWAP, primary (second...) 
/dev/sda3, /home, ext4, 60 GB (or more...) (third primary)
/dev/sda4, /data (or whatever name you like), ext4, whatever size remains available. And we're done, with four primary partitions.
The downside of this scheme is that if you want more than 1 data partition (/data), something like /jack; /lyly; /mike, etc. you have to delete the initial /data partition and create an "extended" partition instead of "primary".
In this case, this partition internally is "/dev/sda4" but when creating the new partition, it will be labeled as /dev/sda5 instead of /dev/sda4.
That means that if /dev/sda4 was skipped, you have an "extended" partition.
This is true only for computers before 2010, that have what is called "BIOS" firmware.

For the UEFI firmware, the rules are very different.
You can read more on Wikipedia about "EFI", "UEFI", GPT (Global Partitioning Table) and so on.
For this type of mainboards (UEFI), the GPT partitioning is mandatory. Hence, the MSDOS partitioning will create problems. There is a long story to "why".
On the other hand, you can create an endless number of "primary" partitions. That is why you need a boot partition.
In the GPT mode, any partition can be flagged as  "boot, esp", but only one partition can hold the bootloader and it has to be a multiboot capable one (GRUB, usually, FreeLoader sometimes).
Thst is why the /dev/sda1 is formatted FAT32 and only requires 512 MB (usually).
Actually, the bootloader itself, takes some 5... 10 MB, sometimes a little more. The rest is empty and other OS's might write their own bootloader there.

If you want more info, read about "MSDOS partitioning" and "GPT (UEFI) partitioning".
It's a lot of reading so take your time. I started using computers back in 1995 so I have some history.
Interestingly, I started using FOSS tools in the late 1995 and eventually, I stayed steady on this course of action, until 2012, when I ended up for good my Win "career", so to speak.
I never used any Win flavor ever since.
I used Mint for some 5 years, then I switched to Linux Lite.
Nothing else, from 2012 till now.

Since you crafted your own machine, I assume you are ready to move on with the partitioning scheme I wrote above.
I usually use GPartED Live to do the partitioning/formatting tasks, but you can skip that, doing the same thing from the installer itself.
The only thing you need to take care of, is when you input the mount points, because the /home partition, has to remain unformatted (it already contains data so it is already formatted).
The only exception is when doing a "clean full install".
If you want me to get into the details about migrating the /home partition, post a reply and mention that.
I've been doing that for more than 12 years so I got used to the annoyances related to the "backup/restore" things.
In time, it will be less and less ugly, as you get used to work with CloneZilla Live.
I've been using it for more than 12 years to backup partitions, even for Win.

Best regards, Șerban.
"It's easy to die for an idea. It's way harder TO LIVE for your idea!"
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Linxer2

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Partitioning in most linux distros use GParted (which is either launched with some assistance during install attempts) or you can manually launch GParted by searching for it. It kind of looks like you already know what to do with your partitions, but are confused about the boot partition?
Assuming all you want to do is have your partitions as listed and just want to run linux lite out of the box, it should already be able to install with the guided mode (if you don't use or have a boot partition, it would warn you to make one and tell you how and ask to go back). Sometimes if you already have a windows os on the machine (even if you wipe out its specific partition), the boot partition will already exist and not require recreation.

I'm being a bit inspecific here because I don't know exactly what hardware or circumstances you want to install this in. Also, I am learning linux like you, so take what I say with a grain of salt. Lot of what I learned was easier for me because I intentionally messed with (or broke) a couple of old guinea pig machines. If you have something you can test on before imaging a laptop that is more important, it's worth trying that approach, in my opinion.
 

 

Edimion

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...
Without clear specifications on the machine it is impossible to go any further.
It is like trying to find a needle in a needle stack!
Try to find what is written on the laptop: Manufacturer, the type.
As an example, yo can read at the left of my post and in the signature what my machines have:
Dell Precision T1700 (Desktop) and ASUS X200MA (netbook)...
Good luck!

Firstly, thanks for the time you take reading my messages. Humbly both can learn something and what's more important some potential Linux Lite user could be reading

Well, mine is a PC :Personal Computer... not a Laptop

I built one with the latest parts in 2009 .And even in my country in some shopcenters I could find their parts nowadays. But even that "good" oldie it's not enough for the latest Debian released Bookworm that make impossible to use even some Graphic Cards bought even five years ago (not the most expensives). So this time I tried Ubuntu mixed Debian distros like Linux Lite

I've looked for what you said: "..Someone doesn't need a Boot partition"
and that's partially true:

Yes, the latest Laptops or any computers don't need that (later than 2010)
BUT, the old ones need sometimes a root partition

With old disk we only have 4 partitions and some more extended
Well, at least I know that old Partition table mine was not too bad, and in the future I'll try to have one extended to format it if I erase so many files.
« Last Edit: April 02, 2024, 06:49:52 PM by Edimion »
 

 

Şerban S.

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Hi!

Without clear specifications on the machine it is impossible to go any further.
It is like trying to find a needle in a needle stack!
Try to find what is written on the laptop: Manufacturer, the type.
As an example, yo can read at the left of my post and in the signature what my machines have:
Dell Precision T1700 (Desktop) and ASUS X200MA (netbook).
Based on that, I can find more details regarding the CPU, RAM and other details
Regarding the storage media I guess there is enough space for any Linux installation.
Just follow the guidelines I posted previously.
There is no need for a dedicated boot partition.
I could only figure out that the drive is somewhere at 240 - 256 GB which is enough space.
The swap partition is too large. If you have 2 GB of RAM, than 4 GB of SWAP is enough even for 4 GB of RAM. 17 GB, is too much and it will be a lot of wasted storage space.
Also, for the Linux partition 100 GB is way too much. You can increase if you want, the /home partition size. This partition holds a lot of user data so this is beneficial.
For the main partition (/, "Root"), stick to the 20 GB size, as I previously outlined. It usually requires somewhere between 7 GB and at most 16 GB so 20 is enough. You'll save 80 GB which you can use for a larger /home partition.

Good luck!
"It's easy to die for an idea. It's way harder TO LIVE for your idea!"
Current Machine:
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 ASUS X200MA , Intel® Celeron® N2830, 2 GB RAM, SSD Kingston A400, 480 GB.
 

 

Edimion

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The problem is that you forgot to mention the machine specs. So, I assume it is an old machine, with BIOS firmware.
....
....
So, there's nothing else to do, except the case yo have a UEFI machine.
....

Thanks for your kind answer, but I'm still a novice Linux user even with more than 10 years using this manual partition
I bought this PC in 2009 ,and I typed msinfo32 with my Win10 that I installed for some personal purposes. So it said it's a Legacy Bios not a UEFI..

My traditional Table Partition was this with some Debian distros:

/dev/sda1 , unformatted[not ext4] (bios-grub),(boot), 538MB
/dev/sda2,     /     ext4 (root) ,100 GB
/dev/sda3,   /home   ext4 ,813 GB
/dev/sda4,   swap    (swap) ,17GB

Please tell me Mr.Şerban S. It'd make my system get broken, is it enough or what else does it need?
Thanks in advance  :wave
« Last Edit: April 02, 2024, 05:08:49 PM by Edimion »
 

 

Şerban S.

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Hi!

Most machines nowadays, have UEFI firmware. This partitioning system (GPT ) needs this kind of partition in order to install a bootloader.
The problem is that you forgot to mention the machine specs. So, I assume it is an old machine, with BIOS firmware.
For this type of machine, there are at least two solutions available:
1. Let the installer do the job. That is fast and easy, but has the inconvenient that your /home is actually a directory on the main partition (/ - Root).
2. Manual install.
That means that you use GPartED Live to pre-partition the media.
The minimalist structure is like this:
/dev/sda1, / (Root), ext4, 20 GB;
/dev/sda2, SWAP, (The amount, depends on the machine type and storage media). Say, 4096 MB. TOTAL = 24 GB;
/dev/sda3, /home, ext4, 60 GB. TOTAL = 84 GB;
/dev/sda4/ /data, ext4. Amount depends on the storage you have. If this is a 120 GB, the rest is allocated automatically to the last partition. That is, about 36 GB.
You can do the partitioning tasks, using the installer.
You need to choose the option "Something different". This will take you to the partition editor window.
You then have to delete all partitions then do the above partitioning tasks.
By default, the installer will have the bootloader installation media set to /dev/sda.
So, there's nothing else to do, except the case yo have a UEFI machine.
If this is the case, reply to this post and add the report for the following command (Copy/Paste in the Terminal):

Code: [Select]
inxi -c 0 -ACdGMNSz
Keep us updated!  :)

Best regards, Șerban.
"It's easy to die for an idea. It's way harder TO LIVE for your idea!"
Current Machine:
 Dell Precision T1700, 16 GB RAM, SSD Kingston A400, 480 GB.
Laptop:
 ASUS X200MA , Intel® Celeron® N2830, 2 GB RAM, SSD Kingston A400, 480 GB.
 

 

Edimion

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Hi,

I don't want have Windows anymore, I've read many questions in this forum, the guide and that didn't help me.
I know some of this steps installing but that guide with DUAL booting of Linux Lite really made me confused... (https://www.linuxliteos.com/manual/install.html#installlegacymode)
To make it clear I'd give you some info of my PC

My bios is Legacy BIOS
I only want to install LinuxLite 6.6 with at last 4 partitions: grub/boot , /(ext4), home(ext4) and swap partition

My main doubt is the FIRST partition the one for the grub/boot .That's because with some Debian distros I only need one with at least 500Mb label as unformatted ,grub, bios... if I remember well.

Please ,help me. Thanks in advance
 

 

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