Development > Coding

int(3) and int('3') is there a difference? (python3.5)

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teage:
I'm actually reading two books, http://inventwithpython.com which has been so far vey easy to understand and follow, and I'm also reading the html version of five into python 3 that is installed under my docs folder. I agree I'm most likely jumping the gun a bit maybe the answer will come full circle as I progress through the book.

teage:
I'm definitely using the method 2 approach.  I have gotten about half way through Zeds book,( learn python the hard way ) about a year ago. He started to lose me just wasn't clicking. Since then I have found an interactive book I plan to read as soon as I'm done with these others. I'm all over the place.

bitsnpcs:
I think when you want to jump forward it is a good sign you are enjoying learning Python and find it interesting. :)
On inventwithpython url which book are you using ?
I like Al Sweigart books a lot, he is a really good teacher for Python, I have these books by Al Sweigart -
Automate the boring stuff with Python - (it is the best first book to use to learn Python imo), I am using Chapter 2 of this book. 
Invent your own computer games with Python - I am using Chapter 5 of this book. (another good first choice book)
Cracking codes with Python - just looked at Chapter 1, I had to wait for some tools to make the wheels nicely.
Making games with Python and Pygame - I haven't looked at this yet it is for doing last of the first books, I am not in to games, I like code, and to see results so it's an easy way to do that etc.
Online the majority I read recommended Zed Shaw - Learn Python the Hard way, I have the Python2 version, I am on Chapter 17 of this book, but have not been using it since I began with the other books, later I will return to it. Personally I don't like this book he has a nasty attitude, that is distracting/disruptive.

The 2 chapters of Automate the boring stuff with Python & 5 chapters of Invent your own computer games with Python were enough to start making my first software/apps, it was where I began trying this.

It took me 1+ year to complete the first app, from idea to finished how I was happy with it as a first one.
It's possible to do projects at the same time as learning, and in between using the books, whenever you feel like it, or have an idea you want to try out for fun, plus you can learn extra things doing your projects, it is all practice.

bitsnpcs:

--- Quote from: teage on February 06, 2019, 03:54:56 PM ---I'm definitely using the method 2 approach.  I have gotten about half way through Zeds book,( learn python the hard way ) about a year ago. He started to lose me just wasn't clicking. Since then I have found an interactive book I plan to read as soon as I'm done with these others. I'm all over the place.

--- End quote ---

I use method 2 also, by "my method" I mean it is belonging to whoever uses it, not me personally, even though I use this way too.
Method 2 is organic, free flowing and malleable, its a good way to learn.

teage:

--- Quote from: bitsnpcs on February 06, 2019, 04:35:01 PM ---I think when you want to jump forward it is a good sign you are enjoying learning Python and find it interesting. :)
On inventwithpython url which book are you using ?
I like Al Sweigart books a lot, he is a really good teacher for Python, I have these books by Al Sweigart -Automate the boring stuff with Python - (it is the best first book to use to learn Python imo), I am using Chapter 2 of this book.Invent your own computer games with Python - I am using Chapter 5 of this book. (another good first choice book)
Cracking codes with Python - just looked at Chapter 1, I had to wait for some tools to make the wheels nicely. Making games with Python and Pygame - I haven't looked at this yet it is for doing last of the first books, I am not in to games, I like code, and to see results so it's an easy way to do that etc.

Online the majority I read recommended Zed Shaw - Learn Python the Hard way, I have the Python2 version, I am on Chapter 17 of this book, but have not been using it since I began with the other books, later I will return to it. Personally I don't like this book he has a nasty attitude, that is distracting/disruptive.

The 2 chapters of Automate the boring stuff with Python & 5 chapters of Invent your own computer games with Python were enough to start making my first software/apps, it was where I began trying this.It took me 1+ year to complete the first app, from idea to finished how I was happy with it as a first one.

It's possible to do projects at the same time as learning, and in between using the books, whenever you feel like it, or have an idea you want to try out for fun, plus you can learn extra things doing your projects, it is all practice.

--- End quote ---

I am reading (Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python, 4th Edition). I like this book a lot. So much so that I bought a paper back copy on amazon. I am not much into games but the book is excellent and easy to understand. My son will love it he is very technical. I wish I had these resources when I was young  ::). I am interested in the cracking codes book too maybe I will check it out sometime down the road.

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